CRITICS CHAPTER



'Criticism is the only thing that stands between the audience and advertising.' - Pauline Kael


WHO WE ARE

Dr David Archibald, University Of Glasgow
Film International, Financial Times, Cineaste


Liza Bear,
Bomb Magazine


Dan Bessie
Filmmaker and Culture Critic

Prof. Dennis Broe
Jump Cut, NY Newsday, Boston Phoenix

Dianne Brooks
The Film Files, Writemovies.com

Lisa Collins
Filmmaker

Benjamin Dickenson
Bright Lights Film Journal, UK

David Ehrenstein
Quarterly Review of Film and Video

Miguel Gardel
Proletaria Press


Michael Haas
Culture critic

Laura Hadden
Pacifica Radio

Gerald Horne
University Of Houston

Reynold Humphries
British Film Historian

Sikivu Hutchinson
BlackFemsLens.org, KPFK Radio

Jan Lisa Huttner
TheHotPinkPen.com, Films For Two

Cindy Lucia
Cineaste Magazine

Pat McGilligan
Film Historian

Prairie Miller
WBAI/Pacifica National Radio Network

Logan Nakyanzi
Go Left TV, Huffington Post

Gerald Peary
Boston Phoenix

Steve Presence
Radical Film Network, UK


Louis Proyect
s
Counterpunch, Marxmail.org

Sandy Sanders
BlueJayWay.net

Nancy Schiesari,
BBC, Channel 4,
Univ. of Texas, Austin

Rebecca Schiller
Culture Critic

David Spaner, Hollywood Inc.

Luis Reyes
, Arsenal Pulp Press

Christopher Trumbo
RIP, January 8, 2011

Dave Wagner
Mother Jones, Film International

Linda Z
LFC Film Club

Noah Zweig
Telesur


Paul Robeson With Oakland, Ca. Shipyard Workers, 1942

Black August

So in order to best cover all bases, progressive film critics tend to consider three categories of assessment, rather than two: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. The first two are self-explanatory. And the third category is reserved for movies that may have been impressively put together, but there's just something offensively anti-humanistic about them.

Stay tuned......

The Organizer

Friday, May 18, 2018

BRO ON THE WORLD FILM BEAT


Bro On The World Film Beat, The Venice Film Festival Report: 'Fiddling While Rome Burns - And Venice Sinks!' Arts Express Paris Correspondent, Sorbonne Professor Dennis Broe, on location over at the Venice Film Festival. Reporting as well on films there opening in US theaters later this year, and what to see - or not. Including the stinging, take no prisoners documentary delving into black politics, poverty and protest in New Orleans, 'What You Gonna Do When The World's On Fire.'

Broe delves beyond the glitz of the cinematic offerings, like First Man - dubbed 'whitey on the moon' - into the rise of right wing leadership surrounding the Festival, and 'evoking the iconography of Mussolini.' While class prejudice by the filmmakers on screen is readily validated by the critics in attendance.


It was again extraordinarily hot in Rome this summer, so hot tourism really halts mid-afternoon to early evening. Meanwhile, the city of Venice continues to sink with the Moise project which is supposed to save it poised to go online, so to speak, next year but with much of the money to fund an enviromentally iffy project already depleted through acts of corruption that forced the last mayor from office...


Bro on the World Film Beat

 ** "Godard in voiceover announces 'War Is Here.' His answer to this chaos and destruction is a title that harkens back to his work in the period of worker and student strikes in May '68 - 50 years ago to the day. And that title reads, There Must Be A Revolution."
 

The Cannes Film Festival Report 2018

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE 


 There are three big stories at the festival and in each the work of the artists, the film directors featured at Cannes, is countering or deepening the official story.
 

The first is the MeToo anti-harassing and women’s rights campaign which two extraordinary films, one contemporary, Woman At War, and other a progressive blast from the past, Blow for Blow, take beyond its sheltered confines and open up to women in general. The second is the move to revalidate traditional movie going with the forbidding of Netflix, countered by Godard and the Chinese director Jia Zhangke’s embracing of cinema in its multi-formats and distribution patterns.
 

Finally, the presence of Saudi Arabia as a purveyor of money and a new, supposed modernity as a means of erasing its part in drawing the Middle East region into a war with a supposedly terrorist Iran, contrasted with the plethora of Iranian directors and their humanist concerns utterly giving the lie to this characterization. 

CONTINUE READING HERE

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